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University of Newcastle, Australia

Article Metrics

InsuTAG: A novel physiologically relevant predictor for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
32 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
InsuTAG: A novel physiologically relevant predictor for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-15460-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rohith N. Thota, Kylie A. Abbott, Jessica J. A. Ferguson, Martin Veysey, Mark Lucock, Suzanne Niblett, Katrina King, Manohar L. Garg

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel physiologically relevant marker, InsuTAG (fasting insulin × fasting triglycerides) can predict insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Data of 618 participants from the Retirement Health and Lifestyle Study (RHLS) were evaluated for the current study. IR was defined by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) scores. Pearson correlations were used to examine the associations of InsuTAG with HOMA-IR and other markers. Predictions of IR from InsuTAG were evaluated using multiple regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were constructed to measure the sensitivity and specificity of InsuTAG values and to determine the optimum cut-off point for prediction of IR. InsuTAG was positively correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.86; p < 0.0001). InsuTAG is a strong predictor of IR accounting for 65.0% of the variation in HOMA-IR values after adjusting for potential confounders. Areas under the ROC curve showed that InsuTAG (0.93) has higher value than other known lipid markers for predicting IR, with a sensitivity and specificity of 84.15% and 86.88%. Prevalence of MetS was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in subjects with InsuTAG values greater than optimal cut-off value of 11.2. Thus, InsuTAG appears to be a potential feasible marker of IR and metabolic syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Professor 2 14%
Other 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Unknown 8 57%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2018.
All research outputs
#1,074,808
of 17,953,032 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#10,488
of 97,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,713
of 331,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,447
of 13,416 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,953,032 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 97,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13,416 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.